What the Wolf of Wall Street Taught Me

While not a huge fan of the movie, something really struck a chord with me when watching this film.

It’s the scene where Jordan Belfort (Leonardo Dicaprio) explains to his team how he created his business empire.

“Just pick up the phone.”

It’s that simple. And it really is.

As a young woman stepping into her fourth year in the corporate world, if there is one lesson I have learned through my short career, it’s that you can’t sit back and wait for the phone to ring. That isn’t how businesses are made, nor how they grow. It is up to you to make business happen.

To truly succeed, you must view your role as a ‘sales’ position – regardless of if you are the company’s CEO, Account Manager or intern. To successfully grow in your role, add value to the company you work for, and therefore enjoy the benefits of a growing business, all it takes is picking up the phone.

The way I see it is that the life I have dreamed of is at the other end of the phone. That huge deal is a couple of buttons and a meeting away. If it means I have to call someone and set a time to meet with them first, then I’m okay with that.

Contributor:

Hollie Azzopardi, Account Manager for Michael Field Pty Ltd.

 

Hanging on the Telephone

I recently attended a charity auction and bid on a few silent auction items. I left before the auctions finished, knowing I wouldn’t find out until later if any of my bids were successful.

A few days after the event, the company managing the silent auctions left a voicemail message advising me I had won a number of items and requested I call back on ‘bladakinowantonoafert’ – or at least that is what the number sounded like because it was spoken so quickly!

I replayed the message several times and tried to decipher the garbled number, eventually giving up in despair. I figured if they really wanted to talk to me they would call back – which they did. Unfortunately the next voicemail was spoken in the same hurried and impatient tone, with the return telephone number sounding like ‘bladakinowantonoafert’.

The next day I received a follow up InMail on LinkedIn. I responded promptly and advised them of the issues I experienced with their voicemail messages.

I haven’t heard back yet, but I hope they makes some changes to the way they handle their voicemail messages, or get used to the fact that people might not be able to call them back if they cannot understand the return telephone number.

What is your experience with voicemail? Are people leaving garbled, hurried and impatient messages or are they carefully crafting their message so it is clear, easy to understand and able to be acted on straight away?

Please leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Contributor:

Michael Field, Director at Michael Field Pty Ltd.